2014-09-09 13.01.15.jpg
2014-09-09 13.01.15.jpg

Research interests


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Research interests


My research interests can be split into three broad categories:

- Navigation and spatial memory in bumblebees and honeybees

- Collective decision-making during swarming in honeybees

- Animal communication and the evolution of multi-modal signals 


The trailer-mounted harmonic radar at Rothamsted Research.

The trailer-mounted harmonic radar at Rothamsted Research.

Navigation and spatial memory in bumblebees and honeybees

I recently joined the Queen Mary lab to work on an ERC funded project titled ‘Space use by bees – radar tracking of spatial movement patterns of key pollinators’. In collaboration with the radar entomology unit at Rothamsted Research, we shall be using harmonic radar to track the flight patterns of bumblebees, honeybees and a variety of other economically important pollinator species. By tracking the movements of these pollinators in a range of different contexts we plan to tease apart the behavioural rules used by these organisms to memorise their surrounding environment, recruit conspecifics to valuable resources and balance the hunt for mates and/or nesting locations with the search for food.


A swarm of the giant Asian honeybee (Apis dorsata) clusters on an old comb fragment on t.he ledge of a building.

A swarm of the giant Asian honeybee (Apis dorsata) clusters on an old comb fragment on t.he ledge of a building.

Collective decision-making during swarming in honeybees

In 2013 I completed a PhD at Sydney University studying the process of collective decision-making during swarming in the western honeybee (Apis mellifera), giant Asian honeybee (Apis dorsata) and red dwarf honeybee (Apis florea). I demonstrated that differences in the specificity of nesting requirements affects the behavioural rules used by different honeybee species during the swarming process. Using the harmonic radar system I hope to answer further questions about navigation and house-hunting in honeybee swarms.


An individually paint-marked red dwarf honeybee (Apis florea) dances enthusiastically to her swarm-mates.

An individually paint-marked red dwarf honeybee (Apis florea) dances enthusiastically to her swarm-mates.

Animal communication and the evolution of multi-modal signals 

Text to come.